Careers - Barber

What they do

If you work as a Barber, you can expect to provide barbering services, such as cutting, trimming, shampooing, and styling hair; trimming beards; or giving shaves to meet your customer’s needs.

Duties

• Trim client hair.
• Clean tools or equipment.
• Discuss service options or needs with clients.
• Clean facilities or work areas.
• Groom wigs or hairpieces.
• Assess skin or hair conditions.
• Maintain financial or account records.
• Perform administrative or clerical tasks.
• Supervise service workers.
• Maintain professional knowledge or certifications.

Career Outlook

Thirty percent (30%) of those employed as a barber work in the ‘Other Services’ (except Public Administration) career sector according to Bureau of Labor Statistics. Remaining percent work in other industry sectors.

There is a very strong outlook for barbers 2019-2029 as the projected job growth is much faster than average.
2019 median wage: $14.50 hourly, $30,150 annual

Video

Video Transcript

The people who cut, style, and color hair, and sell specialty beauty products are barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists. They creatively enhance each client’s appearance and keep up with hairstyle trends. Hairstylists and barbers listen carefully to clients’ preferences, and make sure they are satisfied with their results, while finishing in time for their next appointment. Barbers usually serve male clients for shampoos, haircuts, and shaves. Some fit hairpieces and perform facials. Hairdressers, or hairstylists, provide coloring, chemical hair treatments, and styling in addition to shampoos and cuts, and serve both female and male clients. Cosmetologists perform scalp and facial treatments and conduct make-up analysis. While some barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists work in spas or hotels, most work in barbershops and salons. Some lease chair space from a salon owner, others open their own shops after gaining experience. These workers are on their feet for most of their shift, and often wear gloves or aprons when giving chemical hair treatments. Many work full time, including nights and weekends, however part-time positions are also common. Salon owners work long hours and manage employees… inventory… ordering and bookkeeping. Barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists must complete a program in a state-licensed barber or cosmetology school and obtain licensure. Full-time programs in barbering and cosmetology usually last at least 9 months.

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Cosmetology

Careers – Hairstylist/Hairdresser

What they do

If you work as a Hairstylist and/or Hairdresser, you likely provide beauty services, such as cutting, coloring, and styling hair, and massaging and treating scalp. You may also shampoo hair, apply dress wigs, and remove hair.

Duties

• Clean facilities or work areas.
• Clean tools or equipment.
• Apply solutions to hair for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes.
• Groom wigs or hairpieces.
• Trim client hair.
• Schedule appointments.
• Demonstrate activity techniques or equipment use.
• Maintain client information or service records.
• Promote products, services, or programs.
• Sell products or services.
• Assess hair conditions.
• Supervise service workers.
• Train service staff.
• Apply cleansing or conditioning agents to client hair and/or scalp.

Career Outlook

Fifty percent (50%) of those employed as a hairstylist or hairdresser work in the ‘Other Services’ (except Public Administration) career sector according to Bureau of Labor Statistics. Remaining percent work in other industry sectors.

There is a poor outlook for hairstylist or hairdresser 2019-2029 as the projected job growth is in decline.
2019 median wage: $12.54 hourly, $26,090 annual

Video

Video Transcript

The people who cut, style, and color hair, and sell specialty beauty products are barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists. They creatively enhance each client’s appearance, and keep up with hairstyle trends. Hairstylists and barbers listen carefully to clients’ preferences, and make sure they are satisfied with their results, while finishing in time for their next appointment. Barbers usually serve male clients for shampoos, haircuts, and shaves. Some fit hairpieces and perform facials. Hairdressers, or hairstylists, provide coloring, chemical hair treatments, and styling in addition to shampoos and cuts, and serve both female and male clients. Cosmetologists perform scalp and facial treatments and conduct make-up analysis. While some barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists work in spas or hotels, most work in barbershops and salons. Some lease chair space from a salon owner, others open their own shops after gaining experience. These workers are on their feet for most of their shift, and often wear gloves or aprons when giving chemical hair treatments. Many work full time, including nights and weekends, however part-time positions are also common. Salon owners work long hours and manage employees… inventory… ordering and bookkeeping. Barbers, hairdressers, and cosmetologists must complete a program in a state-licensed barber or cosmetology school and obtain licensure. Full-time programs in barbering and cosmetology usually last at least 9 months.

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Cosmetology

Careers – Manicurist/Pedicurist

What they do

If you work as a Manicurists and/or Pedicurists, it is your job to clean, shape, and beautify fingernails and toenails.

Duties

• Discuss nail treatments and services available.
• Remove nail polish.
• Clean, trim, and file nails.
• Reduce calluses and rough skin.
• Massage and moisturize hands (for a manicure) and feet (for a pedicure).
• Polish or buff nails.
• Advise clients about nail and skin care for hands and feet.
• Promote and sell nail and skin care products.
• Clean and disinfect their work area and tools.

Career Outlook

Seventy-one percent (71%) of those employed as a manicurist and/or pedicurist work in the ‘Other Services’ (except Public Administration) career sector according to Bureau of Labor Statistics. Remaining percent work in other industry sectors.

There is a very strong outlook for manicurist and/or pedicurist 2019-2029 as projected job growth is much faster than average.
2019 median wage: $12.39 hourly, $25,770 annual

Video

Video Transcript

Manicurists and pedicurists work on the hands and feet, grooming fingernails and toenails. They explain services and options available to customers, then offer a treatment— usually starting by soaking the clients’ hands or feet, reducing calluses, and applying lotion to moisturize the skin. The final step is to trim and file nails and apply polish, or artificial fingernails. Repeat business is critical in this field, so customer satisfaction is key. Good listening and interpersonal skills are helpful, along with creativity and precision to create well-finished nails that appeal to each customer. Using sharp tools requires care and a steady hand. Some manicurists and pedicurists operate their own nail salon business. They manage employees, keep inventory, and order supplies. A small, but growing, number of workers make house calls. Manicurists and pedicurists usually work in a nail salon, spa, or hair salon. The job involves a lot of sitting. Because of fumes and toxic exposure from nail polish and other chemicals, they often wear gloves and masks. Although most manicurists and pedicurists work full time including weekends and evenings, many have variable schedules and work part time. Longer workdays are typical for those who are self-employed. Manicurists and pedicurists must complete a state-approved cosmetology or nail technician program and then pass a state exam for licensure.

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Cosmetology

Careers –Esthetician

What they do

The job of an Esthetician is to cleanse and beautify the face and body to enhance a person’s appearance. Esthetician (also termed skincare specialists) give facials, full-body treatments, and head and neck massages to improve the health and appearance of the skin. Some may provide other skin care treatments, such as peels, masks, and scrubs, to remove dead or dry skin.

Duties

• Evaluate clients’ skin condition and appearance.
• Discuss available treatments and determine which products will improve clients’ skin quality.
• Remove unwanted hair, using wax, lasers, or other approved treatments.
• Clean the skin before applying makeup.
• Recommend skin care products, such as cleansers, lotions, or creams.
• Teach and advise clients on how to apply makeup, and how to take care of their skin.
• Refer clients to another skincare specialist, such as a dermatologist, for serious skin problems.
• Disinfect equipment and clean work areas.
Career Outlook

Forty-eight percent (48%) of those employed as an esthetician work in the ‘Other Services’ (except Public Administration) career sector according to Bureau of Labor Statistics. Ten percent (10%) work in Healthcare Services. Remaining percent work in other industry sectors.

There is a very strong outlook for an esthetician 2019-2029 as projected job growth is much faster than average. (14%)
2019 median wage: $16.39 hourly, $34,090 annual

Video

Video Transcript

Their clients could be taking a day to treat themselves at a spa, or fighting a case of acne, but no matter what, skincare specialists take the business of beauty very seriously. Skincare specialists give facials, full-body treatments, and head and neck massages to improve the health and appearance of the skin. Some may provide additional skin care treatments, such as peels, masks, and scrubs, to remove dead or dry skin. They may also recommend skincare products to clients, perform hair removal procedures, or teach clients about skin care techniques. They finish by cleaning and disinfecting any equipment as well as their work area. Most skincare specialists work in salons or health spas, but some work in medical offices and other settings. Generally, skincare specialists work full time and may work evenings and weekends. It is common to work more than 40 hours a week. Depending on the chemicals they use in their practice, skincare specialists may require protective clothing and a well-ventilated workspace. Having to stand for extended periods is often necessary. Skincare specialists must complete a state-approved training program and then pass a state licensure exam— which all states except Connecticut require. Although some high schools offer technical training, most people receive their training from a trade- or technical school.